logo to the Credentialing Information System  
logo to the  State Medical Asset Resource Tracking Tool
Link to the online tools and services page


West Virginia Office of
Emergency Medical Services

350 Capitol Street
Room 425
Charleston WV, 25301

Toll Free: 1-888--747-8367
OEMS Phone: (304) 558-3956
OEMS Fax: (304) 558-8379
Trauma Phone: (304) 558-7124
Trauma Fax: (304) 558-7125

First Confirmed Case of Zika Virus Disease in West Virginia

While the information contained in this news article was current and accurate when we posted it, it may not necessarily represent current WVOEMS policy or procedure. If you have any questions, please contact our office at 304-558-3956.

Posted: Friday, March 11, 2016 7:32 AM

West Virginia is reporting its first confirmed case of Zika virus disease. The case was a traveler who visited Haiti in January 2016 and became ill with symptoms associated with Zika virus disease upon return to West Virginia; symptoms have since resolved. West Virginia is now one of 39 states to report travel-associated Zika virus disease. No states have reported locally-acquired Zika infections.

The Division of Infectious Disease Epidemiology (DIDE) has been monitoring calls related to Zika virus disease through our 24/7/365 on-call service. Since late January 2016, the DIDE has received 27 calls for which there were concern about Zika infection. Fifteen (55.6%) specimens have been collected and sent for Zika testing to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); 3 results have been received, and this is the first positive test. To date, 8 pregnant women have had specimens sent for testing (results still pending).
While Zika virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito (A. aegypti and A. albopictus), infected pregnant women can pass Zika to the fetus during pregnancy. Pregnant women are strongly advised to avoid travel to Zika-affected areas. Additionally, condom use or abstinence throughout pregnancy is strongly encouraged for pregnant women who have a male partner who lives in or has traveled to a Zika-affected area. Research on poor pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with Zika (e.g. microcephaly and other birth defects) and sexual transmission of Zika is ongoing.
As the spring and summer approach, mosquito activity will increase in West Virginia. A. albopictus has been identified in counties across the state. Preventing mosquito bites is still the best way to prevent transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. CDC recommends using mosquito repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and oil of lemon eucalyptus. Also, consider wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outdoors, removing potential mosquito breeding sites near homes (e.g. containers with standing water, tires) and ensuring that window and door screens are intact to prevent mosquitoes from coming indoors.
For more information, please see www.dide.wv.gov or call DIDE at (304) 558-5358, extension 1 or the answering service at (304) 925-9946.

West Virginia is reporting its first confirmed case of Zika virus disease. The case was a traveler who visited Haiti in January 2016 and became ill with symptoms associated with Zika virus disease upon return to West Virginia; symptoms have since resolved. West Virginia is now one of 39 states to report travel-associated Zika virus disease. No states have reported locally-acquired Zika infections.

The Division of Infectious Disease Epidemiology (DIDE) has been monitoring calls related to Zika virus disease through our 24/7/365 on-call service. Since late January 2016, the DIDE has received 27 calls for which there were concern about Zika infection. Fifteen (55.6%) specimens have been collected and sent for Zika testing to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); 3 results have been received, and this is the first positive test. To date, 8 pregnant women have had specimens sent for testing (results still pending).

While Zika virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito (A. aegypti and A. albopictus), infected pregnant women can pass Zika to the fetus during pregnancy. Pregnant women are strongly advised to avoid travel to Zika-affected areas. Additionally, condom use or abstinence throughout pregnancy is strongly encouraged for pregnant women who have a male partner who lives in or has traveled to a Zika-affected area. Research on poor pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with Zika (e.g. microcephaly and other birth defects) and sexual transmission of Zika is ongoing.

As the spring and summer approach, mosquito activity will increase in West Virginia. A. albopictus has been identified in counties across the state. Preventing mosquito bites is still the best way to prevent transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. CDC recommends using mosquito repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and oil of lemon eucalyptus. Also, consider wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outdoors, removing potential mosquito breeding sites near homes (e.g. containers with standing water, tires) and ensuring that window and door screens are intact to prevent mosquitoes from coming indoors.

For more information, please see www.dide.wv.gov or call DIDE at (304) 558-5358, extension 1 or the answering service at (304) 925-9946.

 

File attachment

wv han advisory 113 first reported case of zika virus disease - final 03.10.16.pdf

Privacy, Security and Accessibility | WV.gov | USA.gov | © 2013 State of West Virginia | webmail